Back in June 2008, nVidia launched GeForce GTX 200 series and claimed that the time of confusing naming conventions is up – future products will be much simpler and easy to understand. Well, somebody in nVidia didn’t got that memo because the company continued with frankly, completely stupid naming and renaming policies.

GeForce 8800GT/GTS became 9800GTX/GTX+ and later became GeForce GTS 250, which was okay. But the problem was the rest of the line-up, so we had parts being named the old 9000 series AFTER GeForce GTX200 was launched. In any case, it was nothing short of a mess and marketing nightmare. AIBs [Add-in-Board manufacturers] had huge difficulties in advertising their products, and nVidia didn’t exactly help them out.

In August 2009, I had an interview with Roy Taylor, then serving as nVidia’s main TWIMTBP guy [The Way Its Meant To Be Played]. Most of the nVidia exec team wasn’t happy with the way how the renaming went and it was decided to rename the complete new line-up into something much simpler.

When the company launched its OEM parts for desktops and notebooks with GT120, G210 and GT220, we thought that renaming won’t be happening – but we were wrong. According to information at hand, all of the newly released parts will fit under one banner, with GeForce being the cornerstone brand, followed by a number in hundreds. All of the parts belonging to GT200 [NV60-NV65] series of chips will be renamed into GeForce 2xx. GeForce 9 series [NV55] becomes GeForce 1xx and the upcoming GT300 [NV70] series will simply be named GeForce 3xx [example: 360 and 380].

Of course, this will last until nVidia goes through another change of hearts. Let’s hope it will last a little bit longer.