After hearing from multiple sources spanning on several continents, we can be fairly certain that the samples of nVidia’s first DirectX 11 GPU are going to depart from engineering labs. Just like GT200, GT300 spent several months in the Labs while the drivers were being created.

Given that today’s GeForce drivers contain more code than Windows XP core, we aren’t surprised that nVidia is taking time to get the product ready for market. Just like some media were suggesting that GT200 taped out in March 2008 [while some developers got the GT200 cards as early as three months before that tape out story], GT300 needs time [and human resources] to finish the development. GT300 is the base graphics architecture not just for the standard desktop or notebook graphics, but also as a future graphics base for the Tegra generation of products. And with recent rumors of nVidia implementing ECC feature into the GPU [which is a given, since GDDR5 comes with ECC], Tesla parts should be quite interesting as well.

But now, we have received words that AIBs are getting time frames forthe demonstrations to their own partners and press, with the firstevents happening in September. The dates are obviously planned to bluntthe katana-sharp market attack from ATI’s Radeon 5000 series.

On nVidia’s annual gathering of add-in-board manufacturers [happened a while ago], a lot of harsh words were spoken due to renaming policies, OEM positioning and more importantly, how to combat resurgent ATI – it was stated that a lot is expected from the NV70 e.g. GT300 generation.

Now, the only question is how long it will take for nVidia’s demo team and software vendors to create traditional launch demos. ATI dropped the practice with the Radeon 4000 series, showing raytraced Ruby in its Cinema 2.0 event, but the demo didn’t became available to general public. All in all, computer graphics arena is never boring.