The standard that was recently passed right before CES is to be known as DisplayPort 1.2. This revision of the DisplayPort connector by VESA is designed to increase the functionality of DisplayPort as well as further solidify it’s place as a replacement for almost all types of video signal transmission.

For those that might not know, VESA is a collection of companies who are responsible for helping create the ecosystem that DisplayPort exists within. Meaning, they are the companies that manufacture the connectors themselves, the companies that install them on their computers, the companies who make the cables, and finally… the company who manufactures the display itself. Although, some of the developments mentioned were actually previewed during CES 2009. This is serving as a validation of those previews as well as a detailed insight into exactly what the improvements are.

Some notable improvements go along the lines of performance and usability. And to be quite honest, the increase in performance is what really enables the DisplayPort to become such a broad functioning and useful connector. Because of the performance increases, the DisplayPort devices can simply do more with the same connector. This performance increase is actually double that of v1.1a which is what is currently being used by consumers and businesses. It will support multiple stream support over a single connector as well as support for a higher speed auxiliary channel. They also integrated MiniDP which was originally developed by Apple and included that into the DP 1.2 standard. All of this is accomplished meanwhile still maintaining full backwards compatibility.

Since performance has been doubled to 5.4Gbps per lane, DP is capable of delivering beyond full hd stereo 3D at true 120Hz. There is also improvement in the resolution and color range that DisplayPort is capable of delivering as a result of these performance increases. It can support full 4K resolution among many other lower resolutions. DP 1.2 will also support dual 30? monitors at 2560×1600 off of one DP 1.2 source or four 1920×1200 monitors. So imagine being able to take your laptop to work, and with the right adapters, you can drive four or five 24? monitors off of your laptop, GPU willing of course.