Let’s put that number into perspective. In February, Gmail was the number three web-based email service with slightly less than 11 percent of the market. Yahoo had 56.46 percent market share of US visits and MSN’s Windows Live Mail was number two at 19.14 percent. With nearly 175 million users, Google is pushing Gmail to become a direct competitor to FaceBook’s 500 million claimed users. Google wants to offer more and more features so the users do not jump over to another application.

Gmail reaches 1,000,000 calls within 24hrs of launching its VoIP service

Gmail reaches 1,000,000 calls within 24hrs of launching its VoIP service

FaceBook is the most visited website with Google solidly in second place. Something that the other social networking competitors don’t have is Google’s one million plus servers in data centers around the world. Google is the top search engine in volume and visits by a factor of over three times that of Yahoo, which is limping along in second place. Google logs over a billion searches a day. We guesstimate that 300 million people use Google Search every day.

Google wants to prove they are serious about connecting landlines and mobile phones. On Wednesday, they showed off some "phone booths" they will be setting up in universities and airports. Their marketing gimmick is using a combination of Doctor Who’s TARDIS [Time And Relative Dimensions In Space] British-style phone booth and VoIP to create a unique buzz.

So where does this leave Skype? Giga OM reports that paying Skype customers, using SkypeOut, are worth $96 per year, per user and the company is seeking $100 to $150 million in their IPO to help launch premium features such as group video chat.

Skype has a firm handle on the UCC [Unified Communications and Collaboration] business market. However, Frost & Sullivan’s analyst Iwona Petruczynik, said: "UCC vendors typically argue that Google services, being founded on consumer applications, are not suitable for a corporate world and do not form a complete UCC suite. However, they should recognize where Google is heading in the future and how quickly its products are evolving."

Google already has a good start on showing their Google Apps suite of cloud applications scale up to a city-sized installation. Los Angeles is finalizing a five-year, $2 million contract for Google Apps. The city?s IT department will put 17,000 of the 30,000 total LA city workers on Google Apps if the plan gets approved. The 13,000 workers in the police department and the city attorney’s office would initially only use Gmail and not the other Google Apps, officials said. It will be interesting to see if Google Voice, with its capability of dialing out to landlines and mobile phones, is added to the project.

Google clearly has the computing capacity and knowledge of the cloud to take the Gmail Voice to the business world. Over the next year, how many more people will start using Gmail with the new dial-out feature?