The Mac App Store, Apple’s already controversial software bazaar for Mac apps, may open its doors for business as soon as next Monday, December 13, well ahead of the official end-of-January launch timeframe.

?An insider source? apparently told AppleTell that the Californian firm is readying the store for the official debut a week from today, December 13. 

The publication, however, isn?t holding its fingers crossed for this one beyond noting that Apple is pushing hard for Christmas launch. The company allegedly asked the participating Mac developers to prep their apps for a launch soon.

Apple last week seeded a new beta of Mac OS X 10.6.6 to its developer community. The software will be apparently required to run the free Mac App Store frontend. Steve Jobs promised at an October event that the Mac App Store would launch in 90 days, meaning by the end of January 2011. 

Mac App Store is conceived as a centralized, Apple-hosted repository that will enable folks to discover, download, and install Mac apps with a single click. Developers will get 70 percent from sales and all apps will be sold with a generous licence covering all your Macs, he said.

BSN reported last week that Apple warned developers not to submit trial, demo, or beta software to the Mac App Store, begging the question whether the store will carry free applications like its mobile iOS counterpart.

Jean-Louis Gassée, former head of Macintosh development at Apple, argued in his blog that despite the controversy, the Mac App Store is poised to do for Mac apps what the App Store did for mobile software:

Easier everything: buying, installing, updating. On the iOS platform, there have been more than 7 billion downloads from a library of more than 300,000 apps. 

We?re probably not going to see such numbers on the Mac version. There are far fewer applications, a smaller installed base (in approximate quarterly numbers, think 3 million Macs versus 15 million iPhones), and alternate venues for selling applications.

Nonetheless, even if the new app store has a more modest debut and subsequent growth, it?ll be a good vehicle for smaller developers who struggle with the inconvenience and cost of today?s channels. It might even have the effect of attracting new developers to the OS X platform.

Source: AppleTell