So, how much are you willing to pay for a tablet? Six hundred dollars? Eight hundred? How about twelve hundred bucks for a powerful Android Honeycomb device like the Motorola Xoom tablet? We’re not kidding, that’s apparently what a pre-order page at the online Best Buy store briefly mentioned before it was pulled down, Conceivably Tech reported. The page looked legit and even mentioned this coming Thursday as the launch date – but the price point had us scratching our head. Let’s hope it was just a typo on the retailer’s part.

Wolfgang Gruener, the founder of TG Daily and my former boss there who now runs Conceivably Tech, laughed off the leak. He thinks Best Buy might have intentionally boosted the tablet’s price so that the official $799 price tag seems like a bargain. "You are essentially saving $400," he observed, noting that $1,200 buys you the 128 GB MacBook Air or "an iPad and iPhones for the entire family."

Apple’s entry-level 16GB WiFi iPad and iPhone 4 cost $499 and $199, respectively, meaning you could buy two iPads and an iPhone 4 and still have a few cents left in your pocket compared to the $1999,99 Xoom over at Best Buy. It’s also possible Motorola could be inflating the price of a yet-to-be-acknowledged flagship Xoom model in order to persuade us to opt for the more "reasonably" priced $800 unit. Engadget heard it was just a placeholder and wrote there’s nothing to worry about as the gizmo will in fact retail for $800. 

I don’t know about you, but it seems to me someone needs to run their spreadsheet again because eight hundred bucks is way too high a price a device you really don’t need in the first place. Either that, or the makers of forthcoming Android 3.0 tablets are unable to deliver the latest tech at an affordable price. Could it be so because they don’t get to reap the benefits of economies of scale like Apple does. Either way, paying more than five hundred bucks for a tablet you can live without,  in this economy, seems irrational. Feel free to straighten me up in the comment section below.

Source: Conceivably Tech