Apple fans and watchers can sigh a collective breathe of relief – the official White House photo just went live showing Steve Jobs dinning with President Obama and his Silicon Valley perks. Steve looks as healthy and jovial as we last remember him. The National Enquirer, the sleazy supermarket tabloid earning blood money on predicting celebrity deaths, caused quite a turmoil on Wednesday publishing a gruesome account of Apple CEO allegedly visiting the Stanford Cancer Center, presumably to undergo a chemotherapy treatment.

Relayed by other like-minded gossip publications, the piece spooked investors and caused a brief scare on Nasdaq, where AAPL trades. The tabloid has managed to persuade two doctors who aren’t oncologists and haven’t treated Jobs in person to spell a poor prognosis for the man. They asserted Steve was in the terminal stages of his live and weighed just 135 pounds, prompting them to give him "only six weeks to live." Their prediction was based on a pair of paparazzi shots depicting a very ill and emaciated man from behind, wearing John Lennon monocles as he was entering an old Honda Civic.

BSN has deconstructed the disgusting story and gave our readers five reasons not to panic, explaining why it was a bunch of you-know-what. For example, the frontal close up only depicts the man’s hands and trousers rather than his face. Check out for yourself the Enquirer’s paparazzi shot and the official White House photo of Steve dinning next to Obama, both included below.

The meeting took place at the home of John Doerr of venture capital firm Kleiner Perkins Caufield & Byers. President Obama met with Jobs and his counterparts from Yahoo!, Netflix, Twitter, Google and Facebook to discuss how to maintain the nation’s global technological lead.

Apple on January 17 announced its chief executive was going on his third medical leave of absence "so I can focus on my health" for an unspecified period of time. The Californian gadget maker made it clear in a written statement that Jobs would continue as CEO and remain involved in all strategic decisions.

Jobs had successfully fought the pancreatic cancer in 2004 and received a liver transplant in 2009. Whether the current medical leave is related to the transplant or a relapse of the cancer is a matter of tabloid speculation. We wish him a speedy recovery. By the way, a certain gossip magazine has crossed the line and deserves to be ignored at newsstands, if you ask me.