Recovering from ever spiraling disasters in Japan is more important, according to Apple, than their now postponed launch of the iPad 2 in that country. The Tokyo Apple Store, instead, has been concentrating on helping its employees cope and its customers connect with family.
 
Customers were given use of the Internet and Wi-Fi in the store to try to find loved ones, or glean information about the situation in their hometown. Employees provided accessories to help customers keep their mobile phones up and running. Even Android devotees were given help accessing Wi-Fi in the Apple store.

Apple's iPad 2 was supposed to launch in Japan on March 25th. Today, Apple Stores in Japan are focused on something more human: helping friends and families reconnect

Apple’s iPad 2 was supposed to launch in Japan on March 25th. Today, Apple Stores in Japan are focused on something more human: helping friends and families reconnect

 
The new iPad 2 was to be available to shoppers in Japan?s Ginza District March 25, but launch has been indefinitely postponed. Back in the US, delivery times have slipped and the Apple iPad 2 is in short supply. However, many tech absorbed individuals have been realizing what is really important ? human beings. The importance of whether they get an iPad or any other piece of the latest technology has faded in view of recent events where so many lives were disrupted, with people injured, missing or dead.
 
The technology community has stepped up to the plate with services and donations. Verizon, T-Mobile and Sprint are offering free calls and text messages to Japan throughout March. Google donated $250,000 to relief agencies. Apple?s iTunes created a donation service, with the proceeds going directly to the Red Cross. Days ago, Microsoft surpassed $100,000 which @bing gave to the quake victims garnered from their promise of $1 for every retweet, although that action caught a lot of criticism. 
 
Traditional relief organizations, of course, are accepting donations and several were listed on Yahoo! News. Everyone cautions, however, to research organizations that ask for money, particularly on social networks. Unfortunately, there are still scam artists trying to make money off misery and disaster.
Those of us personally unaffected by Japan?s situation, may move on quickly to the next article comparing clock times for the newest tech device, but as our publisher, Theo Valich said "Getting our head down from the clouds [excuse the pun] and being human is the first order of the day."

Back in 2010, when the first iPad was hitting Japan instead of earthquakes and walls of water, people stood in line for hours, and went all out to show their enthusiasm for the device. A 95 year old even was anticipating ownership saying he needed one to keep up with junior members in his computer club. "It’s important to always try new things, otherwise you get left behind," Mr. Yasuda said. Being left behind has taken on a whole new meaning since the tsunami hit Japan.