nVidia just introduced their king-of-the-hill graphics card featuring no less than six billion of GPU transistors: the GeForce GTX 590. In this article, we’ll show you how the card looks in the nude.

First off, the company showed the card in a rather hip 360 degree animation which you can see above, and sent out a disassembly guide, complete with components you might need if you decide to take the plunge and for instance, manually replace the high-efficiency vapor chamber cooling with a water block.

GeForce GTX 590 Board
GeForce GTX 590 Board

Just like AMD’s Antilles (codename for Radeon HD 6990) board, nVidia Gemini (codename for GeForce GTX 590) comes with more efficient thermal interface material that is optimized for vapor chamber coolin. After AMD came out with Radeon HD 6990, we spoke with several thermal paste manufacturers and they assured us that there are different advanced products on the market already.

nVidia GeForce GTX 590 Thermal Interface Map - Locations below show where thermal materials (paste, pads) are applied.
nVidia GeForce GTX 590 Thermal Interface Map – Locations below show where thermal materials (paste, pads) are applied.

According to nVidia the Thermal Interface Map features three TIM components:

  • Red: GPU (required). Shin-Etsu MicroSi X23-7762
  • Blue: Power supply components and other silicon (required). Fujipoly Sarcon XR-Pe
  • Yellow: Memories (optional, may be reused). Laird Technologies Tflex 300

Note that the GeForce GTX 590 is consisted out of more than 2,200 individual components, thus if you decide to take off the wraps and remove the cooling setup – you have to be careful of not damaging the sensitive components nor bend the PCB (Printed Circuit Board). Without further a due, this is step-by-step disassembly of GeForce GTX 590, as instructed by nVidia.

Rear bracket removal
Step 1 and 2: First and foremost, remove the screws that keep the DVI connectors in place, followed by top screw and remove the rear bracket

Step 1 and 2: First and foremost, remove the screws that keep the DVI connectors in place, followed by top screw and remove the rear bracket

Removing the heatsink
Steps 3 and 4 cover the removal of four screws that keep the heatsink together. Step 5 requires that you use a screwdriver to push the latch downwards and liberate the top cover. Final step is removal of LED light connector from top cover
Steps 3 and 4 cover the removal of four screws that keep the heatsink together. Step 5 requires that you use a screwdriver to push the latch downwards and liberate the top cover. Final step is removal of LED light connector from top cover

Removing Vapor Chamber heatsinks, baseplate and two rear-plates
Removing the main assembly requires the removal of no less than 26 Philips screws (Crosshead screw).
Removing the main assembly requires the removal of no less than 26 Philips screws (Crosshead screw).

Naked PCB
After removal of baseplate, you have the look of the clean PCB. Remove the thermal material where you need to and put the old heatsink (if this was a curiosity run) or a new, for example liquid cooling block.

After removal of baseplate, you have the look of the clean PCB. Remove the thermal material where you need to and put the old heatsink (if this was a curiosity run) or a new, for example liquid cooling block.

For the end, we hope that this guide was a good teaser for our upcoming review which was delayed by a broken file system on the Solid State Drive in one of our overclocking attempts. Yes, we know – Murphy’s law and all.