Update July 1, 2011 at 10:15AM UTC – We have contacted AMD regarding the lower end A- and E2-Series Fusion APUs and got the following reply: "Those will follow later. A specific date has not yet been set. Possibly they will follow gradually, depending on the order and delivery situation."

Original Article:

Today marks the introduction of the desktop version of AMDs Fusion APU based on the Llano core. For reasons only known to the company, the launches of the mobile and desktop versions were made two weeks apart from each other. Of course that didn’t stop the information from flowing: There were the usual leaks, shop listings and even AMD had the website detailing the products online two days early.

Meet the Llano for Desktop: Note that the Socket FM1 Processors are identical in size to previous and future Socket 939/AM2/AM3 processors - only difference is the pinout
Meet the Llano for Desktop: Note that the Socket FM1 Processors are identical in size to previous and future Socket 939/AM2/AM3 processors – only difference is the pinout

Between the mobile and desktop versions there are some minor differences. Technically they are based off the same piece of silicon, with the mobile version simply clocked lower to fit into the thermal envelopes and power requirements of notebooks.

AMD Llano Fusion APU Desktop lineup for features four CPUs: A6-3600/3650 and A8-3800/3850
AMD Llano Fusion APU Desktop lineup for features four CPUs: A6-3600/3650 and A8-3800/3850

The top of the line desktop models don’t come with a turbo feature ? AMD explains this with their high default clock speed. In total four models are officially announced today, as evidenced by the slide shown above. This contradicts itself with the info leaked on AMDs website earlier this week, where 7 models were listed. Notably the absent models are a lower end A6 model and the A4 models which haven’t been mentioned in the launch presentation at all.

AMD A-Series Chipsets: A55 and A75
AMD A-Series Chipsets: A55 and A75

AMD highlights the GPU capabilities of the chip, as this is where it’s true strengths lie. At every possible opportunity they highlight that the A series Fusion APU is capable of running current DX11 games, while their competitor can’t. Indeed low end GPUs become all but obsolete with the graphics power integrated into the APU. Another strength is native USB 3.0 support by the A75 chipset, as we have revealed earlier.

AMD predicts strong rampup of APUs (Intel numbers included)
AMD predicts strong rampup of APUs (Intel numbers included, not counting the ARM-players: NVIDIA, Qualcomm, TI)

AMD thinks they’ve got a winner here and estimate that by next year, the majority of their desktop and notebook sales will be covered by APUs in the coming years. AMD wants to target the majority of the mainstream market with this product, not the high-end. Bright Side of News has already been supplied with test samples of the desktop version of Llano. Due to the proximity with the official launch date, we weren’t able to complete our testing yet, so stay tuned for our own tests.

AMD A-Series APU TAM: $400-699 Computers measure in 80 million units per year
AMD A-Series APU TAM: $400-699 Computers measure in more than 80 million units per year

The roadmap for the future has been outlined at the AMD Fusion Developer Summit, which was recently held in Bellevue, Washington. According to this, AMD already wants to deliver a 50% performance improvement over Llano in 2012 and a APU capable of offering 10 TFLOPs of computational power by 2020, a 20 fold increase over what was just launched.