Today, Nikon announced three different products with 2 of them loosely associated with each other. The Nikon D3200 DSLR is Nikon’s second revision of the D3000, coming after the D3100. The D3200 delivers superior image quality with an extremely simple menu to enable even the most beginner of photographers to easily learn how to properly harness the camera’s 24.2 Megapixel sensor as well as the camera’s ability to shoot in 1080P video.

The D3200 gets its processor from the recently released D4, which obviously has a much better version of the processor at a higher resolution. It also likely borrows its sensor from the D800 as most Nikon cameras recently released have been 16MP except for the D800 (36MP on the D800 and 16MP on the D4). This camera is capable of light sensitivity ranging from ISO 100 to ISO 6400. This is all accomplished while shooting at a framerate of 4FPS and supporting SDXC. The D3200 also added 1080P video recording at higher framerates of 25 and 30FPS where 24FPS was the only option available on the D3100.

The predecessor, the D3100 was only a 16MP sensor that shot at 3FPS and only delivered an ISO range from 100 to 3200. Granted, though, that both cameras do have a ‘Hi’ ISO setting which is generally too grainy to really use on these cameras and is generally considered an expanded ISO. Both cameras feature 11 point auto focus points and use DX 1.5 crop sensor and lenses as opposed to Nikon’s full frame FX lenses. Interestingly, both cameras still use the same batteries and weigh exactly the same. To us, it sounds like an internal upgrade with some software updates. When you consider the price of $699, compared to the D3100’s $649 it really doesn’t sound outrageous at all and actually sounds like quite a nice first DSLR for someone looking to learn.

In addition to the D3200, Nikon also announced their Nikkor 28mm f/1.8G full frame FX lens which will retail for $699. Having used their Nikkor 50mm f/1.8G in the Nikon D5100 and D3X I can certainly say that this new lens will be a welcome addition as it will give users a broad range of view and deliver absolutely sharp pictures beyond imagination.

We also heard about Nikon’s WU-1a which is a Wireless Mobile adapter which enables simple sharing and viewing of photos directly from the camera without having to sacrifice internal space on the camera like you would with an EyeFi solution (currently the biggest EyeFi is 8GB). With this solution, you can also use your Android phone as a remote shutter release for the camera. Currently this solution is intended for the D3200 and can only be used on Android devices, Nikon states that a release for iOS devices should also be out soon. We would absolutely love to test this out with a 1080P Android Tablet while shooting photos as it would make for an interesting tool for photographers and we likely expect the iOS release to be used by many new iPad users.