In his talk with Bloomberg, AMD?s CEO Rory Read might live to regret his statement, which will echo to all owners of older notebooks and most importantly, netbooks.

The statement was as follows: "There is enough processing power on every laptop on the planet today." Target of the statement was the raw processing power (the side in which Intel dominates its rivals from performance, and ARM from power efficient stand), rather than visual power which is dominating the computing of the past couple of years. In a way, we understand Rory?s stance. The company needs to end the war with Intel and fight against NVIDIA, Qualcomm, Texas Instruments and Samsung.

In fact, the brain drain from AMD to Intel got the executives worried to the point that Intel shifted its "Enemy #1" for the third time in five years: the company gave up on multi-decade rivalry with AMD in 2008 and shifted its attention to NVIDIA. Then, during the past year, the "Enemy of the Intel State" was Qualcomm, and now, the enemy #1 is Samsung. While Intel is changing its "enemies" more often than some people change their underwear, AMD finally realized that the company has to shift away from performance wars.

AMD realized the company has to innovate in order to succeed. However, the problem is that it is one thing to talk about "execute, execute, execute" and another thing is that there aren?t many new products on the roadmap after the current 2012-2013 cycle completes.

Saying "all laptops have enough compute power" certainly won?t help AMD to sell more new products. After all, if old parts are "good enough", why buy new ones?