There is no doubt that SeaMicro is one of companies on the role. Just as Penguin Computing shook up the world of telecoms with their approach, Supermicro dethroning IBM, HP and Dell as the most innovative contemporary server maker out there – SeaMicro got a lot of limelight thanks to Intel Corporation.

Their microservers powered by Intel Atom and Xeon processors were considered as one of key technologies, with Intel flying us to multiple events in San Francisco and Portland to show how great their technology was. However, in a re-run of NexGen, when the talk of acquisition came – the company decided to embed itself inside AMD, not Intel. At the recently held AMD Fusion Developer Summit 2012, held in Bellevue, WA – we were once more reminded why both Intel and AMD consider SeaMicro as a hot commodity.

Andrew Feldman, former CEO of SeaMicro and current Corporate Vice President and General Manager of Data Center Server Solutions Business Unit at AMD
Andrew Feldman, former CEO of SeaMicro and current Corporate Vice President and General Manager of Data Center Server Solutions Business Unit at AMD

In the last keynote speech, Andrew Feldman (ex-CEO SeaMicro, now AMD Corporate Vice President and General Manager of Data Center Server Solutions Business Unit) delivered a short speech in which he elaborated the lack of innovation in the traditional space and packing "boxes into boxes". SeaMicro spent $50 million in R&D to develop fast and simple interconnect, resulting with SM1000-XE, an ultra-dense 64-socket Intel Xeon E3-1260L (Sandy Bridge) powered box which has a Red Hat Linux Enterprise Linux certification (RHEL certificate).

SeaMicro prototype PCB showing Socket C32 for 8-core Valencia/Seoul processors, 2xSODIMM, AMD Chipset and four SeaMicro ASICs
SeaMicro prototype PCB showing Socket C32 for 8-core Valencia/Seoul processors, 2xSODIMM, AMD Chipset and four SeaMicro ASICs that utilize physical format of PCIe for their Freedom Supercomputer ultra-fast interconnect

In just a few weeks after the acquisition, SeaMicro showed their first AMD-powered products. By using the "Technology Without Borders"  approach, the company demonstrated a PCB (Printed Circuit Board) almost identical to the ones used in SM1000, with one key difference; Intel Xeon was replaced with AMD Opteron, connected to SeaMicro’s Freedom Supercomputer Fabric featuring massive bandwidth of no less than 1.28 Tbps (1.25GB/s).

The successor of SM1000-XE: SeaMicro plans to launch AMD Opteron-based 64-socket monster.
The successor of SM1000-XE: SeaMicro plans to launch AMD Opteron-based 64-socket monster.

The picture above shows what Andrew considers to be the new king of dense computing hill; a 10U box featuring no less than 64 C32 Sockets running Opteron 4000 Series processors. A single SM1000-sized box now fits 512 cores and up to 2TB of DDR3-1333 Registered ECC memory. While the box has no official name yet (we expect either SM1100 or SM2000), there’s still time to bring it to market.

While it wasn’t announced what type of Opteron core will end up inside the new SeaMicro, the arrival on market coincides with the launch of Seoul octal-core processor with Piledriver cores (replacement for Bulldozer-based Valencia).