Google Glass may just be the most anticipated if not simply over-hyped piece of technology that will soon(ish) be available for purchase. Nonetheless, there is a catch. Yes, it is the inconspicuous camera that will be mounted on every single Google Glass device, and yes, it will theoretically provide masses a utility to invade privacy of others on a level never seen before. Issue is – the right to privacy requires one to not be in public places, and some businesses have launched a preemptive strike with that in mind.

The 5 Point Café in Seattle was among the first ones to do just that ? ban the usage of the Google Glass inside. It was a serious thought and a joke at the same time, posted on the Facebook page of the café while causing quite a commotion in the media ? and the public. Owner Dave Meinert acknowledged that the Seattle is in fact ?a techie town,? knowing that eventually people will come wearing the forthcoming gadget from the Mountain View company.

"You have to understand the culture of The 5 Point which is a sometimes seedy, maybe notorious place and I think people want to go there and be not known," he spoke on the Luke Burbank Show. ?Part of this is a joke, to be funny on Facebook and get a reaction, but part of it is serious because we don’t let people film other people or take photos unwanted of other people in the bar because it’s kind of a private place people go," he added.

Only five days ago, somewhere in between ?Today?s special? and ?Happy hour? posts there was yet another follow-up on the café?s Facebook page that said: ?(?) I have to address some of the people mad about our Google Glass ban. (?) If nothing else, we’re saving you from looking like a complete idiot in public.?

One of the recent popular examples was definitely the one from Joshua Topolsky, editor-in-chief of The Verge, who had the chance to play with Google Glass for a while. Once he and his film crew entered the Starbucks, they were immediately asked to stop filming. The camera crew listened, but Topolsky continued to record everything inside, while people around had no idea what was he wearing ? let alone know that he was recording a video ? even at the cash register. That is something companies and businesses are afraid of, or at least will be. Numerous authors and security researchers think that the Glass bans will become more commonplace once the gadget is released to the market.

Once a Glass user enters someone?s property, it is done, and user should remove the gadget he is wearing. Violations will happen for sure – we are humans. What is more important is the question whether other companies and businesses will follow this trend ? and in what way precisely. In addition, for the public zone where everyone can record any dialogue without the other communicator being aware of that?well, that is a completely new topic. That too, will become a common occurrence as many might already know that the Google Glass will work with prescription lenses. Hopefully everything won’t intensify to a point where people, various locations and institutions have the (Sci-Fi) mini jammer units around…