At least one privacy concern regarding the Google?s Glass has been dealt with by the company (today). In a Google+ post, they have explained that they do not plan to approve any software that has a facial recognition feature. For now. In their own words, that stance will remain until there are ?strong privacy protections in place.? Apparently, folks at Mountain View have realized that they should start addressing the negative perceptions which surround the possible usage scenarios of the Glass, and in the past few weeks this notion was quite clear ? and somewhat pointless.

Facial recognition software is becoming, in one form or another, a part of some modern electronic devices ? smartphones in particular. For instance, Samsung?s flagship unit Galaxy S4 can actively track user?s eyes and face in order to perform certain actions such as pausing video playback if the user is not looking at the screen, scrolling through the webpage, etc. However, Glass was hit with the privacy concerns much earlier ? this March we wrote about the first businesses banning the device before it even became available for a handful of enthusiasts.

Even without the problematic facial recognition, Glass can basically be a walking webcam, and current models don?t exactly provide a way to see if someone is recording or not. And we are not even talking about all of the possible security exploits.

Google is an easy target to bash when it comes to privacy matters. Before the broader consumer launch happens at some point, it would not be surprising if the company starts a public awareness campaign to resolve the possible tumult.

Source: G+