Today we are taking a look at the ROCCAT Kone XTD. The XTD marks ROCCAT?s latest in their line of high end, performance gaming mice known as the Kone series. We?ve listed the specifications below:

  • Pro-Aim Laser Sensor R3 with up to 8200dpi
  • 1000Hz polling rate
  • 1ms response time
  • 12000fps, 10.8megapixel
  • 30G acceleration
  • 3.8m/s (150ips)
  • 16-bit data channel
  • 1-5mm Lift off distance
  • Tracking & Distance Control Unit
  • 72MHz Turbo Core V2 32-bit Arm based MCU
  • 576kB onboard memory
  • Zero angle snapping/prediction
  • 1.8m braided USB cable
  • Dimensions: Max Length 13.5cm, Max Width ~7.8cm, Max Height 4cm.
  • Weight: Approx. 123g (excl. cable) +4 optional weights in 5g, 10g, 15g or 20g


We previously reviewed the Kone+ (the predecessor to the XTD) and gave it a bit of a mixed review. We ran into a scroll wheel issue and did not get a response from technical support. However, we did receive a replacement for it that had a perfectly functioning scroll wheel and it performed superbly. We believed it was a solid mouse with a decent feature set. Or at least, that was what we thought was until we began testing more mice. Each mouse we tested tended to come up short of the Kone+ in a variety of ways. Only then did we realize how exceptional the Kone+ was.

Going back to the focus of our review: the Kone XTD. With the Kone XTD, ROCCAT took the formula that worked so well on the Kone+ and improved upon it. They heavily reinforced and improved the scroll wheel, turning what was the weak point on the Kone+ into one of the best made scroll wheels around. The ergonomics on the Kone XTD are the same as they were on the Kone+, as is the button placement. As with the Kone+, the Kone XTD supports swappable weights and has the same lighting options.

The aesthetic design has changed slightly: the Kone+ had the ROCCAT feline logo filled in, whereas the Kone XTD has the ROCCAT feline logo outlined as well as the letters ?XTD? in the bottom corner.

The two largest improvements other than the crucial scroll wheel redesign are the braided cable on the XTD which is a nice step up from the regular cable on the Kone+, and the improved laser sensor. The 8200 DPI Pro-Aim R3 laser sensor in the Kone XTD is a huge plus for users who like to use ultra-high sensitivity over the 6000 DPI sensor in the Kone+.

Other than those hardware improvements, the software is still the same exceptional program ROCCAT had for the Kone+ (which we discussed here) with one addition: ROCCAT Talk. However, we will be leaving ROCCAT Talk for part of the ROCCAT Isku keyboard review that will be published later this week.


The two mice we use primarily are the Thermaltake Level 10 M and the ROCCAT Kone XTD. Our feelings are that while the Level 10 M has a beautiful and futuristic design, with a very high quality feel, we still find the shape of the Kone XTD to be more ergonomic, and there is yet to be a peripheral company that can compete with ROCCAT?s software suite for customization and tweaking.

At a street price of $89.99, the Kone XTD is not a cheap mouse, but it is definitely one of the best around. Again mentioning the Level 10 M; we awarded it the Prosumer/Enthusiast Innovation Award for its unique and impressive aesthetic and build quality. While the Level 10 M is one of our favorite mice to date, we still prefer the Kone XTD for its comfort in the hand and the complete control the ROCCAT software suite provides. It is for this reason we are awarding the ROCCAT Kone XTD our Prosumer/Enthusiast Editor?s Choice Award. There may not be a perfect mouse, but in our eyes the XTD certainly comes close.