According to a post on Reddit’s r/Android subreddit, the entire Engadget website has been banned from being posted on Reddit. That includes postings as well as comments. The Reddit moderators claim that this is a result of Engadget site spamming and shilling occurring. However, the decision was actually made by the admins of the site and was passed down to the moderators to enforce.

Based on the information that we were able to gather from the Reddit thread in the link above, it appears that Engadget was likely doing something that the admins really look down upon. While no details were given as to what exactly Engadget was doing that brok the ToS, there was a serious allusion to the fact that Reddit’s anti-spam policy includes the getting of fake upvotes in order to get an article to the top.

Now, as a competitor of Engadget’s this can be seen with two very different perspectives. First and foremost, I wonder how many hits Engadget could have gotten as a result of this spamming and shilling. Secondly, I wonder how many of my hits have been impacted by this move since Reddit is without a doubt one of the most trafficked sites on the entire internet. With a current Alexa rating of 87 globally and a rank of 31 in the US and sees no sight of slowing down according to Alexa’s stats. You also have to wonder how many hits I could now start to get as a result of that traffic no longer being directed towards Engadget and improving their Google Page Rank.

The concerning part about this, however, is whether or not Engadget has actually done anything wrong and whether or not they are responsible. For all we know, it could be one of Engadget’s own competitors’ ploys to accomplish this very result of getting the site banned from Reddit (a much less likely version of events, conspiracy considered). Furthermore, it also constitutes as a form of censorship, which I generally abhor. That is, unless someone really deserves it. Since Reddit’s admins haven’t really provided many details about the ban, we can only speculate. One of the reasons for doing this, they say, is so that others do not find out how Engadget did it nor how Reddit caught them. This way they will be able to catch others attempting to do the same, they say.