In one of the most depressing rumor squashings I have ever had to personally experience, I am reporting to you today that Time Warner Cable’s rumored 300 Mbps, 200 Mbps services are not rolling out on July 7th. In fact, after speaking with Time Warner Cable’s representative for the San Diego area we got some even more depressing news.

According to Bret Picciolo of Time Warner Cable, the company will not be rolling out their 300 and 200 Mbps services in the San Diego area. This is in spite of multiple CSRs indicating to myself and other people that such services would be available starting July 7th. Bret made it clear that there was no hard date for any such services and that they were mostly intended for the Los Angeles and New York areas. He said that any such roll outs would be done by hub and not city-wide, which would take time to do rather than doing all at once.

What’s even more depressing about this rumor squashing is that not only is Time Warner Cable neglecting a clear desire for their customers to get 300 and 200 Mbps speeds, but they are also not bringing 100 Mbps speeds to San Diego. That’s right, San Diegans are STILL going to be stuck with 50/5 Mbps service unless they are blessed by the gods and Webpass is available in their building (or Webpass is willing to install).

As if all of that horrible news wasn’t depressing enough, Bret gave absolutely no indication of ANY plans to expand their 100, 200 or 300 Mbps services anywhere or any time in San Diego. He said that if the company were to do so, they would make a public announcement like they had for Los Angeles, New York and Austin. If you read our original article about the rumor you can see what kind of competition (there’s basically none) that exists within the San Diego area. This means that San Diego customers are basically stuck between Time Warner Cable, AT&T Uverse or possible Cox cable if they’re not in a Time Warner Cable service area. Either way, its a disgusting duopoly and this rumor squashing is a perfect example of that.

If anything, this confirms my belief that San Diego should start its own municipal broadband or municipal fiber network in order to keep the city competitive with places that will get Google Fiber or already have fiber.